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ApplianceAid.com is your resource for appliance repair help and appliance parts. We also have appliance purchase help information if your old appliance is just too far gone for fixing, and a wealth of other appliance information.


Appliance Tip of the Week...


Some common electrical requirements for large major appliances:


**Always check local electrical codes and the use/care manual for your appliance.**


110-120 volt AC circuits ( basics )....


  • The polarity for the power wires is important. If the plug outlet is wired backwards.... things like spark moduals in gas ranges can fail, you can receive a possible shock trying to simply replace a light bulb.
  • Ground cord plug prone must never be broken off! Where a standard two-prong wall receptacle is encountered, it is the personal responsibility and obligation of the customer to have it replaced with a properly grounded three-prone wall receptacle. The ground is a safety in case of a short.
  • If you have to use an extension cord, it is absolutely necessary that is be a UL/CSA listed 3 wire cord that the current carrying rating of the cord in amperes be equivalent to, or greater than, the branch circuit rating.
  • Low voltage can be a problem. Stall voltage for a 110-120 volt AC motor is 100 volts. If the line voltage drops below 100 volts AC, the motor can/will fail and possibly damage the motor. Too many things on one line can drop the line voltage below the stall point.
  • Most, if not all 110-120 volt appliances must be on a dedicated line. This means nothing else on the same line or plug.

220-240 volt AC circuits ( basics )....


  • Most 220-240 volt circuits today are a 4 wire circuit. Red, power...black, power...white, neutral...green or bare, ground.
  • Older electric dryers had a 3 prong cord while newer dryers have a 4 prong cord. Help on changing from 3 to 4 pronged cord....or have an electrician do this for you.
  • Wiring help for the 4 prone receptacle
  • The ground is a safety in case of a short. The ground is also used for some "auto-sensor" circuits.

Extra Electrical Helps an Tips....


  • Ohm testing a capacitor
  • Electrical Repair - Problem Solving Solutions - new installations Q & A forum.
  • Wiring Done Right. Please have a peek.
  • The appliances that typically need to be connected to their own circuit with an independent circuit breaker. Refrigerators, Wall ovens, Electrical ranges, Water heaters, Furnaces, Heating and air conditioning units, Washing machines and Dryers. The dedicated circuit will help ensure that the high-power appliance has enough amperage to operate properly and safely without causing the circuit breaker to trip.


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Electrical Requirements....


Some information about GFI outlets and your appliances.

Dishwasher (posted 2010) - 110 - 120 volt, 60 hertz, properly grounded circuit protected by a minimum 15 amp breaker or fuse ( d/w without temp boost ) to a maximum of 20 amp breaker or fuse ( d/w with temp boost ) #14 gauge house wire minimum for 15 amp protection, #12 gauge is a must for 20 amp protection. A separate (dedicated ) circuit serving this appliance is recommended.

Dishwasher Built in (posted 2021) - 120-volt, 60 Hz, AC-only, 15amp or 20amp, fused electrical supply, copper wire only, a time-delay fuse or circuit breaker on a separate circuit.

Dishwasher Portable (posted 2021) - 120-volt, 60 Hz, AC-only, 15- or 20- amp, fused electrical supply, a time-delay fuse or circuit breaker on a separate circuit.

Dryer Electric (posted 2010) - 220 - 240 volt, 60 hertz, properly grounded circuit with 30 amp breaker or fuse protection. #10 gauge wire is preferred.

Dryer Electric USA (posted 2021) - Supply the required 3 or 4 wire, single-phase, 120/240 volt, 60 Hz, AC-only electrical supply on a separate 30 A circuit, fused on both sides of the line. Connect to an individual branch circuit. Do not have a fuse in the neutral or grounding circuit.

Dryer Electric Canada (posted 2021) - Supply the required 4-wire, single-phase, 120/240 volt, 60 Hz, AC-only electrical supply on a separate 30 A circuit, fused on both sides of the line. A time-delay fuse or circuit breaker is recommended. Connect to an individual branch circuit.

Dryer Gas (posted 2010) - 110 - 120 volt, 60 hertz, properly grounded circuit protected by a 15 amp circuit breaker or fuse. #14 gauge house wire minimum, #12 is preferred.

Dryer Gas (posted 2021) - A separate 15 or 20 A circuit for a gas dryer, If using power supply cord, electrical outlet must be located within 2 ft. (610 mm) of either side of dryer. A time-delay fuse or circuit breaker is recommended. Connect to an individual branch circuit.

Freezer Chest (posted 2021) - It must be plugged directly into a properly grounded three-prong receptacle, protected with a 15-amp time delay fuse or circuit breaker. The receptacle must be installed in accordance with the local codes and ordinances. Receptacles protected by Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCI) are NOT RECOMMENDED. Do NOT use an extension cord or adapter plug.

Freezer Upright (posted 2021) - It must be plugged directly into a properly grounded three-prong receptacle, protected with a 15-amp time delay fuse or circuit breaker. The receptacle must be installed in accordance with the local codes and ordinances. Avoid connecting the appliance to a Ground Fault Interrupter (GFI) circuit. Do not use an extension cord or adapter plug.

Microwave (posted 2010) - 110 - 120 volt, 60 hertz, properly grounded circuit protected by a 15/20 amp circuit breaker or fuse. #14 gauge house wire minimum for 15 amp protection, #12 gauge is a must for 20 amp protection. A separate (dedicated ) circuit serving this appliance is recommended.

Microwave Counter Top (posted 2021) - A 120 volt, 60 Hz, AC only, 15- or 20-amp electrical supply with a fuse or circuit breaker.

Microwave Over The Range (posted 2021) - A 120 V, 60 Hz, AC only, 15 or 20 A electrical supply with a time-delay fuse or time-delay circuit breaker on a separate circuit serving only this microwave oven.

Microwave Over The Range With Convection (posted 2021) - A 120 V, 60 Hz, AC only, 15 or 20 A electrical supply with a time-delay fuse or time-delay circuit breaker on a separate circuit serving only this microwave oven.

Range Gas (posted 2010) - 110 -120 volt, 60 hertz, properly grounded branch circuit protected by a 15/20 amp circuit breaker or fuse. Must be properly grounded and polarized. #14 gauge house wire minimum for 15 amp protection, #12 gauge is a must for 20 amp protection.

Range Gas (posted 2021) - A 120 V, 60 Hz, AC only, 15 Amp fused, electrical circuit is required. A time-delay fuse or circuit breaker is also recommended. It is recommended that a separate circuit serving only this range be provided. Electronic ignition systems operate within wide voltage limits, but proper grounding and polarity are necessary. Check that the outlet provides 120 V power and is correctly grounded.

Range Electric (posted 2010) - 220 - 240 volt, 60 hertz, properly grounded circuit with 40 amp breaker or fuse protection with #8 gauge wire. With a 50 amp breaker, # 6 gauge wire is required.

Range Electric (posted 2021) - Check the USA and Canada electrical suggestions on this common electric ranges installation guide.

Range Electric Free Standing 2 Oven (posted 2021) - Check the USA and Canada electrical suggestions on this common 2 oven ranges installation guide.

Refrigerator (posted 2010) - 110 - 120 volt, 60 hertz, properly grounded circuit protected by a 15 amp circuit breaker or fuse. #14 gauge house wire minimum, #12 is preferred. A separate (dedicated ) circuit serving this appliance is recommended.

Refrigerator (posted 2021) - A 115 volt, 60 Hz, AC only 15 or 20 Amp fused, grounded electrical supply is required. It is recommended that a separate circuit serving only your refrigerator and approved accessories be provided. Use an outlet that cannot be turned off by a switch. Do not use an extension cord.

Refrigerator All Fridge (posted 2021) - Plug the appliance into its own dedicated 115 Volt, 60 Hz, 15 Amp, AC only electrical outlet. Avoid connecting the appliance to a Ground Fault Interrupter (GFI) circuit.

Washing Machine (posted 2010) - 110 - 120 volt, 60 hertz 15/20 amp circuit breaker or fused electrical supply line. Power cord must be connected to a properly grounded and polarized outlet. Because of water conditions found in a laundry room, a GFI ( ground fault interrupter ) outlet might also be considered. #14 gauge house wire minimum for 15 amp protection, #12 gauge is a must for 20 amp protection.

Washing Machine Newer Top Load (posted 2021) - A 120 V, 60 Hz., AC only, 15 or 20 A, fused electrical supply is required. A time-delay fuse or circuit breaker is recommended. It is recommended that a separate circuit breaker serving only this appliance be provided.

Washing Machine Newer Front Load (posted 2021) - A 120 V, 60 Hz., AC only, 15 or 20 A, fused electrical supply is required. A time-delay fuse or circuit breaker is recommended. It is recommended that a separate circuit breaker serving only this appliance be provided.

**Always check local electrical codes and the use/care manual for your appliance.**



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